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Chelkash and Other Stories

By: Maksim Gorky

This happened in 1892, a famine year, at a point between Sukhum and Ochemchiry, on the shore of the Kodor River, so near the sea that through the gay babble of the clear waters of the mountain stream the muffled thunder of the billows was distinctly heard. It was an autumn day. Yellow cherry-laurel leaves were circling and glistening in the white foam of the Kodor like nimble salmon fry. I was sitting on some rocks near the bank and reflecting that the sea-gulls and corm...

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The Spoilers

By: Rex Beach

Excerpt: GLENISTER gazed out over the harbor, agleam with the lights of anchored ships, then up at the crenelated mountains, black against the sky. He drank the cool air burdened with its taints of the sea, while the blood of his boyhood leaped within him. ?Oh, it?s fine ? fine,? he murmured, ?and this is my country ? my country, after all, Dex. It?s in my veins, this hunger for the North. I grow. I expand.?

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Thomas Wingfold, Curate : Volume 2

By: George Macdonald

It was nearly dark when they arrived again at the lodge. Rachel opened the gate for them. Without even a THANK YOU, they rode out. She stood for a moment gazing after them through the dusk, then turned with a sigh, and went into the kitchen, where her uncle sat by the fire with a book in his hand. How I should like to be as well made as Miss Lingard! she said, seating herself by the lamp that stood on the deal-table. It MUST be a fine thing to be strong and tall, and abl...

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My Summer in a Garden

By: Charles Dudley Warner

MY DEAR MR. FIELDS, I did promise to write an Introduction to these charming papers but an Introduction, what is it? -- a sort of pilaster, put upon the face of a building for looks' sake, and usually flat, very flat. Sometimes it may be called a caryatid, which is, as I understand it, a cruel device of architecture, representing a man or a woman, obliged to hold up upon his or her head or shoulders a structure which they did not build, and which could stand just as well...

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Julius Caesar's War Commentaries

By: W. A. Mcdevitte

Book 4 - (55 B.C.) [4.1]The following winter (this was the year in which Cn. Pompey and M. Crassus were consuls), those Germans [called] the Usipetes, and likewise the Tenchtheri, with a great number of men, crossed the Rhine, not far from the place at which that river discharges itself into the sea. The motive for crossing [that river] was, that having been for several years harassed by the Suevi, they were constantly engaged in war, and hindered from the pursuits of ag...

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The Lady of Shalott (1842)

By: Lord Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson

Excerpt: On either side the river lie Long fields of barley and of rye, That clothe the wold and meet the sky; And thro? the field the road runs by To many?tower?d Camelot; And up and down the people go, Gazing where the lilies blow Round an island there below, The island of Shalott. Willows whiten, aspens quiver, Little breezes dusk and shiver Thro? the wave that runs for ever By the island in the river Flowing down to Camelot. Four gray walls, and four gray towers, Ove...

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Les Grandes Journees de la Constituante

By: Albert Mathiez

Excerpt: CHAPITRE I. LA REUNION DES TROIS ORDRES Le 17 juin, ayant termine depuis deux jours l'appel nominal de tous les deputes aux Etats generaux, le Tiers, auquel s'etaient deja reunis 12 cures, se proclamait Assemblee nationale, et, prevoyant que cet acte revolutionnaire serait suivi de represailles, decidait d'opposer a une repression possible la menace de la greve de l'impot: ?Considerant qu'en effet les contributions, telles qu'elles se percoivent actuellement dan...

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Northern Lights, V5

By: Gilbert Parker

Excerpt: THE ERROR OF THE DAY. The ?Error of the Day? may be defined as ?The difference between the distance or range which must be put upon the sights in order to hit the target and the actual distance from the gun to the target.? Admiralty Note. A great naval gun never fires twice alike. It varies from day to day, and expert allowance has to be made in sighting every time it is fired. Variations in atmosphere, condition of ammunition, and the wear of the gun are the co...

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The Spectacles and Other

By: Jean De La Fontaine

Excerpt: THE SPECTACLES I LATELY vowed to leave the nuns alone, So oft their freaks have in my page been shown. The subject may at length fatigue the mind; My Muse the veil howe?er is still inclined, Conspicuously to hold to publick view, And, ?mong the sisters, scene and scene pursue. Is this too much? the nicest tricks they play; Through soft amours oft artfully they stray, And these in full I?d readily detail, If I were sure the subject would not fail; And that?s impo...

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The Villa Lucienne

By: Ella D'Arcy

Excerpt: Madame Koetlegon told the story, and told it so well that her audience seemed to know the sombre alley, the neglected garden, the shuttered house, as intimately as though they had visited it themselves, seemed to feel a faint reverberation of the incommunicable thrill which she had felt which the surly guardian, the torn rag of lace, the closed pavilion had made her feel. And yet, as you will see, there is in reality no story at all; it is merely an account of h...

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Buddy and Brighteyes Pigg

By: Howard Roger Garis

Excerpt: STORY I. BUDDY PIGG IN A CABBAGE Once upon a time, not so many years ago, in fact it was about the same year that Jackie and Peetie Bow Wow, the little puppy dog boys lived in their kennel house, there used to play with them, two queer little brown and white and black and white animal children, called guinea pigs. They were just as cute as they could be, and, since I have told you some stories about rabbits, and squirrels and ducks, as well as about puppies, I w...

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The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, And Instruction Series

By: Jonathan Ingram

Excerpt: HADLEY CHURCH. [Illustration] Hadley, Mankin, or Monkton, Hadley, was formerly a hamlet to Edmonton. It lies north?west of Enfield, and comprises 580 acres, including 240 allotted in lieu of the common enclosure of Enfield Chase. Its name is compounded of two Saxon words?Head?leagh, or a high place; Mankin is probably derived from the connexion of the place with the abbey of Walden, to which it was given by Geoffrey de Mandeville, earl of Essex, under the name o...

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On the Gull's Road

By: Willa Sibert Cather

IT often happens that one or another of my friends stops before a red chalk drawing in my study and asks me where I ever found so lovely a creature. I have never told the story of that picture to any one, and the beautiful woman on the wall, until yesterday, in all these twenty years has spoken to no one but me. Yesterday a young painter, a countryman of mine, came to consult me on a matter of business, and upon seeing my drawing of Alexandra Ebbling, straightway forgot ...

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Roman Holidays, And Others

By: William Dean Howells

Excerpt: I. UP AND DOWN MADEIRA. No drop?curtain, at any theatre I have seen, was ever so richly imagined, with misty tops and shadowy clefts and frowning cliffs and gloomy valleys and long, plunging cataracts, as the actual landscape of Madeira, when we drew nearer and nearer to it, at the close of a tearful afternoon of mid?January. The scenery of drop?curtains is often very holdly beautiful, but here Nature, if she had taken a hint from art, had certainly bettered her...

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Death by Proxy

By: Maxwell Grant

Excerpt: ALL the residents of Glynwold knew this mansion by sight. They knew, by sight, every member of the family that lived in it. They knew, too, of the tragic events which had fallen upon it. But no one imagined the menace that hung over it. No one knew no one even guessed what was to come. It was a massive gray?stone mansion, rambling, topped with conical turrets. Spacious lawns, well?placed landscaping, gardens and woodland walks were part of the estate. But there ...

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Treasure Trail

By: Maxwell Grant

THE man who stopped inside the doorway of the Cobalt Club was stubby in build, shabby of attire. His plain face looked weather-beaten beneath his grizzled hair. He had taken off his hat - awed, perhaps, by luxurious surroundings of New York's most exclusive club. Strong, squatty fingers clutched the hat against the buttons of a threadbare overcoat. Colorless eyes peered from the man's flattish face, scanning everywhere, for someone the man expected to see. The desk atten...

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The Case of Summerfield

By: William Henry Rhodes

[A.D. 211.] He was a most eloquent man, according to St. Jerome; and his writings against Montanism were so forcible as to call forth Tertullian himself, to confute him, if possible. He flourished under Commodus and Severus, and probably until the times of Caracalla. He bears testimony to the existence of a canon of Scripture, [10] and to its inspired authority as the rule of faith and practice; and he witnesses, by citation, to the Gospel of St. Matthew. The Revelation ...

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The Circus Boys Across the Continent, Or Making the Start in the S...

By: Edgar B.P. Darlington

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE BOYS HEAR GOOD NEWS. ?You never can guess it you never can guess the news, Teddy,? cried Phil Forrest, rushing into the gymnasium, his face flushed with excitement. Teddy Tucker, clad in a pair of linen working trunks and a ragged, sleeveless shirt, both garments much the worse for their winter?s wear, was lazily swinging a pair of Indian clubs.

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Castle of Crime

By: Maxwell Grant

Excerpt: THE hotel clerk smiled as he handed Bob Osden a letter, along with the room key; and Bob gave a grin in return. The grin, incidentally, wiped away a very solemn look that had been on Bob?s face. He had been expecting that letter, and needing it very badly. It wasn?t good policy, however, to show too much eagerness in opening it. Nonchalantly, Bob thrust the letter into his pocket and went to an elevator. Reaching his room, he closed the door, sat down at the wri...

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A Message from the Sea

By: Charles Dickens

Excerpt: FOR Captain Jorgan to sit anywhere in his long?skirted blue coat and blue trousers, without holding converse with everybody within speaking distance, was a sheer impossibility. So the captain fell to talking with the fishermen, and to asking them knowing questions about the fishery, and the tides, and the currents, and the race of water off that point yonder, and what you kept in your eye, and got into a line with what else when you ran into the little harbour; ...

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