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La Vie Dernest Psichari

By: Henri Massis

Excerpt: Voici nos destinees et voici notre chef. Cette vie, soudain rompue dans sa course rapide et dont la plenitude incomparable semble vouloir restreindre la brievete tragique, ce n'est point seulement la biographie d'un jeune homme qui chercha ses modeles parmi les heros et les saints, c'est l'histoire exemplaire de notre age, c'est, fraternellement soufferte, partagee, vecue, la Passion de toute une jeunesse, avec elle accomplie dans le sang de la plus belle mort.

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The Thirty Years War

By: Johann Christoph Friedrich (Friedrich Schiller) von Schiller

Preface: The present is the best collected edition of the important works of Schiller which is accessible to readers in the English language. Detached poems or dramas have been translated at various times since the first publication of the original works; and in several instances these versions have been incorporated into this collection. Schiller was not less efficiently qualified by nature for an historian than for a dramatist. He was formed to excel in all departments...

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Gargantua and Pantagruel

By: Francois Rabelais

Introduction: Had Rabelais never written his strange and marvellous romance, no one would ever have imagined the possibility of its production. It stands outside other things?a mixture of mad mirth and gravity, of folly and reason, of childishness and grandeur, of the commonplace and the out?of?the?way, of popular verve and polished humanism, of mother?wit and learning, of baseness and nobility, of personalities and broad generalization, of the comic and the serious, of ...

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The Anatomy of Melancholy : What It Is, With All the Kinds, Causes...

By: Democritus Junior

Excerpt: His residence was chiefly at Oxford; where, in his chamber in Christ Church College, he departed this life, at or very near the time which he had some years before foretold, from the calculation of his own nativity, and which, says Wood, being exact, several of the students did not forbear to whisper among themselves, that rather than there should be a mistake in the calculation, he sent up his soul to heaven through a slip about his neck. Whether this suggestio...

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The Circular Staircase

By: Mary Roberts Rhinehart

McKnight is gradually taking over the criminal end of the business. I never liked it, and since the strange case of the man in lower ten, I have been a bit squeamish. Given a case like that, where you can build up a network of clues that absolutely incriminate three entirely different people, only one of whom can be guilty, and your faith in circumstantial evidence dies of overcrowding. I never see a shivering, white-faced wretch in the prisoners' dock that I do not hark...

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The Life of Henry the Fifth

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: THE Life of Henry the Fift. Enter Prologue. O For a Muse of Fire, that would ascend The brightest Heauen of Inuention: A Kingdome for a Stage, Princes to Act, And Monarchs to behold the swelling Scene. Then should the Warlike Harry, like himselfe, Assume the Port of Mars, and at his heeles (Leasht in, like Hounds) should Famine, Sword, and Fire Crouch for employment. But pardon, Gentles all: The flat vnraysed Spirits, that hath dar?d, On this vnworthy Scaffold, ...

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Troilus and Criseyde

By: Geoffrey Chaucer

The double sorwe of Troilus to tellen, 1 / That was the king Priamus sone of Troye, / n lovinge, how his aventures fellen / Fro wo to wele, and after out of Ioye, / My purpos is, er that I parte fro ye. 5 / Thesiphone, thou help me for tendyte / Thise woful vers, that wepen as I wryte!

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The Autobiography of Calamity Jane

By: Calamity Jane

Excerpt: Part One Calamity Jane by Herself My maiden name was Marthy Cannary; was born in Princeton, Mo., May 1, 1852; father and mother natives of Ohio; had two brothers and three sisters, I being the oldest of the children. As a child I always had a fondness for adventure and outdoor exercise, and especial fondness for horses which I began to ride at an early age and continued to do so until I became an expert rider, being able to ride the most vicious and stubborn of ...

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Elinor Wyllys

By: Susan Fenimore Cooper

Excerpt: THERE is so much of mystification resorted to, at the present time, in the publication of books, that it has become proper that the editor of Elinor Wyllys should explain what has been his own connection with this particular work. The writer of this book is a valued female friend, who had a right to ask, and did ask, its editor?s advice and assistance, in presenting it to the public. This advice and assistance have been cheerfully afforded, though neither has pr...

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The Last Word

By: Alexander Kuprin

Excerpt: Yes, gentlemen, I killed him! In vain do you try to obtain for me a medical certificate of temporary aberration. I shall not take advantage of it. I killed him soberly, conscientiously, coldly, without the least regret, fear or hesitation.

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Sound and Fury

By: O. Henry

MR. PENNE—Good morning, Miss Lore. Glad to see you so prompt. We should finish that June installment for the Epoch to-day. Leverett is crowding me for it. Are you quite ready? We will resume where we left off yesterday. (Dictates.) Kate, with a sigh, rose from his knees, and— Miss LORE—Excuse me; you mean rose from her knees, instead of his, don't you? MR. PENNE—Er—no—his, if you please. It is the love scene in the garden. (Dictates.) Rose from his knees where, blushing ...

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The Village Coquette or the Supposed Lottery

By: Riviere Dufresny

Excerpt: ACT I. Girard (holding two letters and reading them) From Paris. To Monsieur Le Baron of Hamlet. Let?s take care of this letter for him. He?s not at home. (putting the Baron?s letter in his pocket, he opens the other letter) And the other?s for me, Girard. I dare to hope that the list of winning lottery numbers is in this letter. Right, my cousin, the master printer in Paris, favors the role I've taken. Love is my guide in this roguery. With this false lottery l...

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The English

By: Jacques Casanova

I passed a night which seemed like a never-ending nightmare, and I got up sad and savage, feeling as if I could kill a man on the smallest provocation. It seemed as if the house, which I had hitherto thought so beautiful, was like a millstone about my neck. I went out in my travelling clothes, and walked into a coffee-house, where I saw a score of people reading the papers. I sat down, and, not understanding English, passed my time in gazing at the goers and comers. I ha...

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Adela Cathcart, Vol. 1

By: George Macdonald

It was the afternoon of Christmas Eve, sinking towards the night. All day long the wintry light had been diluted with fog, and now the vanguard of the darkness coming to aid the mist, the dying day was well nigh smothered between them. When I looked through the window, it was into a vague and dim solidification of space, a mysterious region in which awful things might be going on, and out of which anything might come; but out of which nothing came in the meantime, except...

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Shehens Houn Dogs

By: Elia Wilkinson Peattie

EDWARD Berenson, the Washington correspondent for the New York News, descended from the sleeping-car at Hardin, Kentucky, and inquired for the stage to Ballington's Gap. But there was, it appeared, no stage. Neither was a conveyance to be hired. The community looked at Berenson and went by on the other side. He had, indeed, as he recollected, with a too confiding candor, registered himself from Washington, and there were reasons in plenty why strangers should not be take...

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The Young Mother

By: William A. Alcott

Preface: There is a prejudice abroad, to some extent, against agitating the questions??What shall we eat? What shall we drink? and Wherewithal shall we be clothed???not so much because the Scriptures have charged us not to be over ?anxious? on the subject, as because those who pay the least attention to what they eat and drink, are supposed to be, after all, the most healthy. It is not difficult to ascertain how this opinion originated. There are a few individuals who ar...

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Exhortation to the Heathen

By: Clement of Alexandria

Alexandria becomes the brain of Christendom: its heart was yet beating at Antioch, but the West was still receptive only, its hands and arms stretched forth-towards the sunrise for further enlightenment. From the East it had obtained the Scriptures and their authentication, and from the same source was deriving the canons, the liturgies, and the creed of Christendom. The universal language of Christians is Greek. To a pagan emperor who had outgrown the ideas of Nero's ti...

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The Epistle of Ignatius to the Philippians

By: Ignatius

Ignatius, who is also called Theophorus, to the Church of God which is at Philippi, which has obtained mercy in faith, and patience, and love unfeigned: Mercy and peace from God the Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ, who is the Saviour of all men, specially of them that believe. (1)...

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The Giant Wistaria

By: Charlotte Perkins and Stetson Gilman

Meddle not with my new vine, child! See! Thou hast already broken the tender shoot! Never needle or distaff for thee, and yet thou wilt not be quiet! The nervous fingers wavered, clutched at a small carnelian cross that hung from her neck, then fell despairingly. Give me my child, mother, and then I will be quiet! Hush! hush! thou fool-some one might be near! See-there is thy father coming, even now! Get in quickly!...

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Measvre, For Measure

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Exceedes (in that) the lists of all aduice My strength can giue you: Then no more remaines But that, to your sufficiency, as your worth is able, And let them worke: The nature of our People, Our Cities Institutions, and the Termes For Common Iustice, y'are as pregnant in As Art, and practise, hath inriched any That we remember: There is our Commission, From which, we would not haue you warpe; call hither, I say, bid come before vs Angelo: What figure of vs think...

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