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Have We Failed with the Indian?

By: H.L. Dawes

Excerpt: WHEN the public mind is directed to a discussion of the wisest and safest attitude toward other alien races whose future has been put in our keeping, our policy with the Indians becomes an object lesson worthy of careful and candid study. It is for this purpose that attention is here invited to what that policy has come to be, and what it has thus far accomplished. The treatment of the Indian has been the subject of much study and experiment that has proved frui...

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The Blue Fairy Book

CONTENTS THE BRONZE RING PRINCE HYACINTH AND THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS EAST OF THE SUN AND WEST OF THE MOON THE YELLOW DWARF LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD THE SLEEPING BEAUTY IN THE WOOD CINDERELLA; OR, THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP THE TALE OF A YOUTH WHO SET OUT TO LEARN WHAT FEAR WAS RUMPELSTILTZKIN BEAUTY AND THE BEAST THE MASTER-MAID WHY THE SEA IS SALT THE MASTER CAT; OR, PUSS IN BOOTS FELICIA AND THE POT OF PINKS THE WHITE CAT THE WATER-LILY. THE GOLD-SPINNERS...

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The Case of Congressman Coyd

By: Maxwell Grant

Excerpt: A COLD drizzle had settled upon Washington. The massive bulk of the Capitol building showed hazy in the dulled afternoon light. The high dome of the great building was barely discernible against the foggy sky. Atop the dome, the resplendent statue of Armed Victory formed a shrouded figure amid the swirl of mist. A taxicab was rolling in from the Union Depot. Arriving at the Capitol grounds, the cab pulled up at the east entrance. A wiry passenger alighted, bundl...

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Satanstoe; Or, The Littlepage Manuscripts

By: James Fenimore Cooper

Every chronicle of manners has a certain value. When customs are connected with principles, in their origin, development, or end, such records have a double importance; and it is because we think we see such a connection between the facts and incidents of the Littlepage Manuscripts, and certain important theories of our own time, that we give the former to the world. It is perhaps a fault of your professed historian, to refer too much to philosophical agencies, and too l...

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My Life and Work

By: Henry Ford

Introduction: WHAT IS THE IDEA? We have only started on our development of our country?we have not as yet, with all our talk of wonderful progress, done more than scratch the surface. The progress has been wonderful enough?but when we compare what we have done with what there is to do, then our past accomplishments are as nothing. When we consider that more power is used merely in ploughing the soil than is used in all the industrial establishments of the country put tog...

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The Agrarian Justice

By: Thomas Paine

To preserve the benefits of what is called civilized life, and to remedy at the same time the evil which it has produced, ought to considered as one of the first objects of reformed legislation. Whether that state that is proudly, perhaps erroneously, called civilization, has most promoted or most injured the general happiness of man is a question that may be strongly contested. On one side, the spectator is dazzled by splendid appearances; on the other, he is shocked by...

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Charlie to the Rescue

By: R.M. Ballantyne

Excerpt: Chapter One. Introduces the Hero. To be generally helpful was one of the chief points in the character of Charlie Brooke. He was evidently born to aid mankind. He began by helping himself to everything in life that seemed at all desirable. This was natural, not selfish. At first there were few things, apparently, that did seem to his infant mind desirable, for his earliest days were marked by a sort of chronic crossness that seemed quite unaccountable in one so ...

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The Patagonia

By: Henry James

The houses were dark in the August night and the perspective of Beacon Street, with its double chain of lamps, was a foreshortened desert. The club on the hill alone, from its semi-cylindrical front, projected a glow upon the dusky vagueness of the Common, and as I passed it I heard in the hot stillness the click of a pair of billiard-balls. As every one was out of town perhaps the servants, in the extravagance of their leisure, were profaning the tables. The heat was in...

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The Blue Lagoon : A Romance

By: H. de Vere Stacpoole

CONTENTS -- BOOK I -- PART I WHERE THE SLUSH LAMP BURNS -- I. UNDER THE STARS -- II. THE SHADOW AND THE FIRE -- V. AND LIKE A DREAM DISSOLVED -- V. VOICES HEARD IN THE MIST -- VI. DAWN ON A WIDE, WIDE SEA -- VII. STORY OF THE PIG AND THE BILLY-GOAT -- VIII. S-H-E-N-A-N-D-O-A-H -- X. SHADOWS IN THE MOONLIGHT -- X. THE TRAGEDY OF THE BOATS...

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The New Englander

By: Sherwood Anderson

Excerpt: HER name was Elsie Leander and her girlhood was spent on her father?s farm in Vermont. For several generations the Leanders had all lived on the same farm and had all married thin women, and so she was thin. The farm lay in the shadow of a mountain and ...

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Youth Challenges

By: Clarence B. Kelland

Bonbright Foote VI arose and stood behind the long table which served him as a desk and extended his hand across it. His bearing was that of a man taking a leading part in an event of historic importance. My son, said he, it gratifies me to welcome you to your place in this firm. Then he smiled. When Bonbright Foote VI smiled it was as though he said to himself, To smile one must do thus and so with the features, and then systematically put into practice his instructions...

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The Seven against Thebes

By: Aeschylus

Clansmen of Cadmus, at the signal given By time and season must the ruler speak Who sets the course and steers the ship of State With hand upon the tiller, and with eye Watchful against the treachery of sleep. For if all go aright, thank Heaven, men say, But if adversely-which may God forefend!— One name on many lips, from street to street, Would bear the bruit and rumour of the time, Down witk Eteocles!-a clamorous curse, A dirge of ruin. May averting Zeus Make good his...

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The Gilded Age

By: Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

Henry Brierly took the stand. Requested by the District Attorney to tell the jury all he knew about the killing, he narrated the circumstances substantially as the reader already knows them. He accompanied Miss Hawkins to New York at her request, supposing she was coming in relation to a bill then pending in Congress, to secure the attendance of absent members. Her note to him was here shown. She appeared to be very much excited at the Washington station. After she had a...

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Oceanic Mythology

By: Roland B. Dixon

Preface: IN the following pages we shall seek to present an outline of the mythology of the Oceanic peoples. Although certain aspects of the mythic system of this area, as well as the myths of separate portions of it, have been treated by others, the present writer does not know of any recent endeavour to gather all available materials from the whole region, or to discuss the relationship of the mythologies of the various portions of Oceania to one another, and to the ad...

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John Dough and the Cherub

By: Frank L. Baum

Excerpt: THE Great Elixir Over the door appeared a weather?worn sign that read: ?JULES GROGRANDE, BAKER.? In one of the windows, painted upon a sheet of cardboard, was another sign: ?Home?made Bread by the Best Modern Machinery.? There was a third sign in the window beyond the do orway, and this was marked upon a bit of wrapping?paper, and said: ?Fresh Gingerbread Every Day.? When you opened the door, the top of it struck a brass bell suspended from the ceiling and made ...

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Theosophy

By: Lafcadio Hearn

The work and literature of the Theosophical Society in India and England have been subjects of much favorable and unfavorable comment in those countries; but it was not until quite recently that they attracted attention in the very capital of materialism and scepticism,—Paris. In fact, a new branch of the Society was lately established there; and to judge from the powerful article upon it in the Nouvelle Revue, it promises to flourish luxuriantly. There is much of novelt...

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Letters on Sweden, Norway, And Denmark

By: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

INTRODUCTION: Mary Wollstonecraft was born on the 27th of April, 1759. Her father -- a quick-tempered and unsettled man, capable of beating wife, or child, or dog -- was the son of a manufacturer who made money in Spitalfields, when Spitalfields was prosperous. Her mother was a rigorous Irishwoman, of the Dixons of Ballyshannon. Edward John Wollstonecraft -- of whose children, besides Mary, the second child, three sons and two daughters lived to be men and women -- in co...

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Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt, Volume 2

By: Francis Hueffer

Excerpt: THE German musical genius Richard Wagner (1811?1883) could be considered to be one of the ideological fathers of early 20th century German nationalism. He was well?suited for this role. Highly intelligent, sophisticated, complex, capable of imagining whole systems of humanistic philosophy, and with an intense need to communicate his ideas, he created great operas which, in addition to their artistic merits, served the peculiar role of promoting a jingoistic, cha...

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The Marriages

By: Henry James

Excerpt: Chapter One. ?Won?t you stay a little longer?? the hostess asked while she held the girl?s hand and smiled. ?It?s too early for every one to go ? it?s too absurd.? Mrs. Churchley inclined her head to one side and looked gracious; she flourished about her face, in a vaguely protecting sheltering way, an enormous fan of red feathers. Everything in her composition, for Adela Chart, was enormous. She had big eyes, big teeth, big shoulders, big hands, big rings and b...

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The Lost Princess of Oz

By: L. Frank Baum

Some of my youthful readers are developing wonderful imaginations. This pleases me. Imagination has brought mankind through the Dark Ages to its present state of civilization. Imagination led Columbus to discover America. Imagination led Franklin to discover electricity. Imagination has given us the steam engine, the telephone, the talking-machine and the automobile, for these things had to be dreamed of before they became realities. So I believe that dreams -- day dream...

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